Established by Fathi Ibrahim Bayoud 2005 - Homs

3 Knesset members storm Al-Aqsa compound

Middle East | 2018-07-09 10:03:00
3 Knesset members storm Al-Aqsa compound
On Sunday, Israeli Minister of Agriculture Uri Ariel stormed the flashpoint compound, for the first such tour by an Israeli official since 2015. 

Last week, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lifted a three-year ban on government officials and Knesset members visiting the site. 
Netanyahu then allowed Knesset members to visit the compound once every three months, according to local Israeli media. 

In October 2015, Netanyahu banned Knesset members from entering the Al-Aqsa compound in an effort to calm violence that broke out across Israel-occupied West Bank as a result of repeated incursions by Jewish settlers into the site. 

For Muslims, Al-Aqsa represents the world's third holiest site. Jews, for their part, refer to the area as the "Temple Mount," claiming it was the site of two Jewish temples in ancient times. 

Some extremist Jewish groups have called for the demolition of the Al-Aqsa Mosque so that a Jewish temple might be built in its place. 

In September 2000, a visit to the flashpoint religious site by late Israeli politician Ariel Sharon sparked what later became known as the "Second Intifada," a popular Palestinian uprising in which thousands of people were killed. 

Israel occupied East Jerusalem -- in which the Al-Aqsa is located -- during the 1967 Middle East War. It later annexed the entire city in 1980, unilaterally claiming it as the capital of the self-proclaimed Jewish state. 
Anadolu Agency
Comments (0)

Post Your Comments

fill all fields below
*This confirmation code will prevent auto submit
X :Latest News
'High time we made a decision': May pleads with lawmakers to back her on Brexit      SDF denies report of final Daesh defeat      U.S. grants Iraq 90-day waiver to buy Iranian energy: State Dept.      Hunger stalks Yemen's remote villages after four years of war      Goretzka strike salvages a draw for new-look Germany      Iran leader calls economy 'urgent problem'      Dollar struggles, stocks up on dovish Fed but trade fears persist      New Zealand to ban assault weapons in wake of mosque shootings